There has been growing concern about the fate of refugees trapped in Libya. Now there is a call for action.

Eritrea Libya

Here is a report from the Irish Times.

For refugees and migrants in Libyan detention centres, a phone marks the difference between life and death. They’re carefully hidden, topped up by contacts in other parts ofLibya, and charged in secret, wherever electricity can be found.

At no time has this been more obvious than since fighting broke out 10 days ago.

As a state of emergency continues in Tripoli, and fighting escalates quickly, thousands of migrants and refugees previously held in detention centres have been scattered across the city, all desperate to stay alive.

The Irish Times is in touch with at least five groups, who have used smartphones to message about everything from a lack of food, to looters, bomb blasts and attacks by armed men, to how they feel they’ve been abandoned by the United Nationsand other international organisations.

Since fighting erupted on August 26th, between rival armed militias vying for control of Tripoli, many of the estimated 8,000 refugees and migrants in official detention centres have been “released”, moved to different locations, or have escaped and are now sleeping on the streets.

Many were never registered by the UN – despite regularly asking for it – and detention centre managers say they have no lists of who exactly was in their centres. This means it is impossible to know the number that have already disappeared.

Some aid workers suggest detention centres obscure this information deliberately. Migrants and refugees have been known to pay their way out (the going rate is $20,000 [€17,000]said one Eritrean) or they’ve been sold to traffickers or to rich Libyans as slaves. A migrant can be sold as forced labour for as much as $600, said a Libyan aid worker. Now the fighting is fierce, consequences can prove deadly.

Source=https://eritreahub.org/eritreans-trapped-in-libya-join-the-london-call-for-action

Yemane Gebremeskel – Eritrea’s Minister of Information – has tweeted that this visit is under way.

Horn Peace

The decision to send the ministers comes after the signing of a tripartite agreement between Eritrea, Ethiopia and Somalia. [See below]

And after the Ethiopians and Somalis urged Eritrea to make peace with Djibouti.

The background to the Djibouti mission is the conflict between Eritrea and Djibouti that erupted in 2008.

For many years it has been a source of tension in the region and was an outstanding issue, after Eritrea and Ethiopia signed a peace deal earlier this year.

The Djibouti-Eritrea question was also the reason why UN military sanctions against Eritrea were not lifted – despite UN monitors declaring that Eritrea was no longer aiding the Somali Islamist group, Al-Shabaab.


Joint Declaration on Comprehensive Cooperation Between Ethiopia, Somalia and Eritrea

Considering that the peoples of Ethiopia, Somalia and Eritrea share close ties of geography, history, culture and religion as well as vital common interests;

Respecting each other’s independence, sovereignty, and territorial integrity;

Desiring to bolster their historical ties to achieve their lofty objectives;

The Governments of Ethiopia, Somalia and Eritrea have reached the following agreement that reflects the aspirations of their peoples:-

1. The three countries shall foster comprehensive cooperation that advances the goals of their peoples.

2. The three countries shall build close political, economic, social, cultural and security ties.

3. The three countries shall work in coordination to promote regional peace and security.

4. The three governments hereby establish a Joint High-Level Committee to coordinate their efforts in the framework of this Joint Declaration.

Done in Asmara, September 5, 2018

For the Federal Democratic Republic of Ethiopia
Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed

For the Federal Republic of Somalia
President Mohamed Abdullahi Mohamed

For the State of Eritrea
President Isaias Afwerki

Source=https://eritreahub.org/last-piece-in-the-horn-of-africa-peace-puzzle-eritrea-ethiopia-and-somalia-send-foreign-ministers-to-djibouti

Liberty Magazine Issue # 52

%AM, %06 %451 %2018 %11:%Sep Written by

The leaders of Somalia, Ethiopia and Eritrea have agreed to initiate dialogue as they seek to resolve a border dispute between the latter and Djibouti, according to Abdinur Mohamed, the communications director in the office of the Somali president.

 

Djibouti in July petitionedthe United Nation’s security council, asking the body to ‘facilitate an agreement between them upon a mutually acceptable means of peaceful dispute settlement’.

The disputed land in question is the Dumeira mountain and Dumeira island which Djibouti claims is being illegally occupied by Eritrea.

Both Somalia and Ethiopia have been actively working to achieve the normalisation of relations between Djibouti and Eritrea.

Takeda Alemu, Ethiopia’s ambassador to the United Nations told the security council in July, that Addis Ababa had conducted fruitful and useful discussionswith the Djibouti foreign minister.

Somalia’s president, Mohamed Abdullahi Mohamed Farmaajo, also travelled to Djiboutiin August to discuss his own country’s normalisation of relations with Eritrea after he was criticised for calling on the United Nations to lift sanctions on Eritrea.

An arms embargo imposed on Eritrea since 2009 was chiefly to do with its alleged support for Somali insurgent group Al-Shabaab but also because of its agression against Djibouti and refusal to enter any form of mediation over the disputed regions.

Calls for the 2009 Eritrean sanctions to be lifted has been strong in recent months following the peace deal between the country and Ethiopia.

The Djibouti – Eritrea standoff is seen by most political and security analysts as the final rift needed to be solved to restore durable peace to the Horn of Africa region.

Source=https://eritreahub.org/ethiopia-and-somalia-urge-eritrea-to-end-border-dispute-with-djibouti

The leaders of Somalia, Ethiopia and Eritrea have agreed to initiate dialogue as they seek to resolve a border dispute between the latter and Djibouti, according to Abdinur Mohamed, the communications director in the office of the Somali president.

 

Djibouti in July petitionedthe United Nation’s security council, asking the body to ‘facilitate an agreement between them upon a mutually acceptable means of peaceful dispute settlement’.

The disputed land in question is the Dumeira mountain and Dumeira island which Djibouti claims is being illegally occupied by Eritrea.

Both Somalia and Ethiopia have been actively working to achieve the normalisation of relations between Djibouti and Eritrea.

Takeda Alemu, Ethiopia’s ambassador to the United Nations told the security council in July, that Addis Ababa had conducted fruitful and useful discussionswith the Djibouti foreign minister.

Somalia’s president, Mohamed Abdullahi Mohamed Farmaajo, also travelled to Djiboutiin August to discuss his own country’s normalisation of relations with Eritrea after he was criticised for calling on the United Nations to lift sanctions on Eritrea.

An arms embargo imposed on Eritrea since 2009 was chiefly to do with its alleged support for Somali insurgent group Al-Shabaab but also because of its agression against Djibouti and refusal to enter any form of mediation over the disputed regions.

Calls for the 2009 Eritrean sanctions to be lifted has been strong in recent months following the peace deal between the country and Ethiopia.

The Djibouti – Eritrea standoff is seen by most political and security analysts as the final rift needed to be solved to restore durable peace to the Horn of Africa region.

The leaders of Somalia, Ethiopia and Eritrea have agreed to initiate dialogue as they seek to resolve a border dispute between the latter and Djibouti, according to Abdinur Mohamed, the communications director in the office of the Somali president.

 

Djibouti in July petitionedthe United Nation’s security council, asking the body to ‘facilitate an agreement between them upon a mutually acceptable means of peaceful dispute settlement’.

The disputed land in question is the Dumeira mountain and Dumeira island which Djibouti claims is being illegally occupied by Eritrea.

Both Somalia and Ethiopia have been actively working to achieve the normalisation of relations between Djibouti and Eritrea.

Takeda Alemu, Ethiopia’s ambassador to the United Nations told the security council in July, that Addis Ababa had conducted fruitful and useful discussionswith the Djibouti foreign minister.

Somalia’s president, Mohamed Abdullahi Mohamed Farmaajo, also travelled to Djiboutiin August to discuss his own country’s normalisation of relations with Eritrea after he was criticised for calling on the United Nations to lift sanctions on Eritrea.

An arms embargo imposed on Eritrea since 2009 was chiefly to do with its alleged support for Somali insurgent group Al-Shabaab but also because of its agression against Djibouti and refusal to enter any form of mediation over the disputed regions.

Calls for the 2009 Eritrean sanctions to be lifted has been strong in recent months following the peace deal between the country and Ethiopia.

The Djibouti – Eritrea standoff is seen by most political and security analysts as the final rift needed to be solved to restore durable peace to the Horn of Africa region.

The leaders of Somalia, Ethiopia and Eritrea have agreed to initiate dialogue as they seek to resolve a border dispute between the latter and Djibouti, according to Abdinur Mohamed, the communications director in the office of the Somali president.

 

Djibouti in July petitionedthe United Nation’s security council, asking the body to ‘facilitate an agreement between them upon a mutually acceptable means of peaceful dispute settlement’.

The disputed land in question is the Dumeira mountain and Dumeira island which Djibouti claims is being illegally occupied by Eritrea.

Both Somalia and Ethiopia have been actively working to achieve the normalisation of relations between Djibouti and Eritrea.

Takeda Alemu, Ethiopia’s ambassador to the United Nations told the security council in July, that Addis Ababa had conducted fruitful and useful discussionswith the Djibouti foreign minister.

Somalia’s president, Mohamed Abdullahi Mohamed Farmaajo, also travelled to Djiboutiin August to discuss his own country’s normalisation of relations with Eritrea after he was criticised for calling on the United Nations to lift sanctions on Eritrea.

An arms embargo imposed on Eritrea since 2009 was chiefly to do with its alleged support for Somali insurgent group Al-Shabaab but also because of its agression against Djibouti and refusal to enter any form of mediation over the disputed regions.

Calls for the 2009 Eritrean sanctions to be lifted has been strong in recent months following the peace deal between the country and Ethiopia.

The Djibouti – Eritrea standoff is seen by most political and security analysts as the final rift needed to be solved to restore durable peace to the Horn of Africa region.

The leaders of Somalia, Ethiopia and Eritrea have agreed to initiate dialogue as they seek to resolve a border dispute between the latter and Djibouti, according to Abdinur Mohamed, the communications director in the office of the Somali president.

 

Djibouti in July petitionedthe United Nation’s security council, asking the body to ‘facilitate an agreement between them upon a mutually acceptable means of peaceful dispute settlement’.

The disputed land in question is the Dumeira mountain and Dumeira island which Djibouti claims is being illegally occupied by Eritrea.

Both Somalia and Ethiopia have been actively working to achieve the normalisation of relations between Djibouti and Eritrea.

Takeda Alemu, Ethiopia’s ambassador to the United Nations told the security council in July, that Addis Ababa had conducted fruitful and useful discussionswith the Djibouti foreign minister.

Somalia’s president, Mohamed Abdullahi Mohamed Farmaajo, also travelled to Djiboutiin August to discuss his own country’s normalisation of relations with Eritrea after he was criticised for calling on the United Nations to lift sanctions on Eritrea.

An arms embargo imposed on Eritrea since 2009 was chiefly to do with its alleged support for Somali insurgent group Al-Shabaab but also because of its agression against Djibouti and refusal to enter any form of mediation over the disputed regions.

Calls for the 2009 Eritrean sanctions to be lifted has been strong in recent months following the peace deal between the country and Ethiopia.

The Djibouti – Eritrea standoff is seen by most political and security analysts as the final rift needed to be solved to restore durable peace to the Horn of Africa region.

The leaders of Somalia, Ethiopia and Eritrea have agreed to initiate dialogue as they seek to resolve a border dispute between the latter and Djibouti, according to Abdinur Mohamed, the communications director in the office of the Somali president.

 

Djibouti in July petitionedthe United Nation’s security council, asking the body to ‘facilitate an agreement between them upon a mutually acceptable means of peaceful dispute settlement’.

The disputed land in question is the Dumeira mountain and Dumeira island which Djibouti claims is being illegally occupied by Eritrea.

Both Somalia and Ethiopia have been actively working to achieve the normalisation of relations between Djibouti and Eritrea.

Takeda Alemu, Ethiopia’s ambassador to the United Nations told the security council in July, that Addis Ababa had conducted fruitful and useful discussionswith the Djibouti foreign minister.

Somalia’s president, Mohamed Abdullahi Mohamed Farmaajo, also travelled to Djiboutiin August to discuss his own country’s normalisation of relations with Eritrea after he was criticised for calling on the United Nations to lift sanctions on Eritrea.

An arms embargo imposed on Eritrea since 2009 was chiefly to do with its alleged support for Somali insurgent group Al-Shabaab but also because of its agression against Djibouti and refusal to enter any form of mediation over the disputed regions.

Calls for the 2009 Eritrean sanctions to be lifted has been strong in recent months following the peace deal between the country and Ethiopia.

The Djibouti – Eritrea standoff is seen by most political and security analysts as the final rift needed to be solved to restore durable peace to the Horn of Africa region.

Nevsun Finds a White Knight in Zijin With $1.41 Billion Deal

 
Source: Bloomberg
  • Miners are chasing copper supply on outlook for tight market

Zijin Mining Group Co. agreed to buy Nevsun Resources Ltd. for $1.41 billion to add copper assets in Serbia and Eritrea and enable the Canadian firm to ward off a hostile bid from rival Lundin Mining Corp.

Zijin, a Chinese gold and base metals producer, will pay C$6 per share in cash, trumping Lundin’s C$4.75 a share bid launched in July, the companies said Wednesday. Nevsun rejected repeated overtures from Lundin this year, saying that its offers undervalued the company and its assets.

Lundin Launches Hostile Bid After Nevsun Rebuffs Advances

The fight for Nevsun highlights how miners are scrambling to acquire copper reserves amid forecasts that supply of the metal used to make cables and wires will be tight in coming years on increasing demand for power generation and new energy vehicles. The company’s prized Timok copper-gold deposit is among just a handful of projects that aren’t already controlled by a big miner.

Lundin Chief Executive Officer Paul Conibear argued that his company was better positioned to provide the financing needed to develop Timok, as well as Nevsun’s Bisha mine in Eritrea. However, Nevsun CEO Peter Kukielski said last month the company had received interest from several companies and expected to find a better offer. Vancouver-based Nevsun’s board had spurned a joint offer made public in May by Lundin and Euro Sun Mining Inc. as “complicated” in structure and too low.

The deal also comes days after Zijin won a tender to buy Serbia’s state-owned RTB Bor. It offered to invest almost $1.5 billion in the country’s biggest mining and smelting company over six years, according to the energy and mining minister last week.

China’s Zijin Wins Serb Copper Miner Pledging $1.5 Billion

While mining companies are bullish on the longer-term prospects for copper, the price has slumped almost 20 percent in London this year as a strengthening dollar, escalating trade disputes and emerging market turmoil damped the outlook for demand.

 

The Zijin offer is a 57 percent premium to Nevsun’s closing price on May 7, the day before Lundin first publicly announced its intention to acquire the company. It is not subject to any financing conditions.

— With assistance by James Poole

Source=https://eritreahub.org/china-invests-in-eritreas-mining-buying-nevsun-to-obtain-bisha-mine